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Scotty Joe Weaver (March 26, 1986 – July 22, 2004) was an 18-year-old murder victim from Bay Minette, Alabama, whose burned and partially decomposed body was discovered on July 22, 2004, a few miles from the mobile home in which he lived. He had been beaten, strangled and stabbed numerous times, partially decapitated, and his body doused in gasoline and set on fire.  The Baldwin County District Attorney, David Whetstone, stated that Weaver’s sexual orientation was a factor in the crime. He remarked that the brutality involved “is suggestive of overkill, which is not something you see in a regular robbery and murder.” Alabama’s hate crimes statute does not apply to people targeted because of their sexual orientation.  Three people were charged with capital murder and robbery in connection with the crime, two of whom were Weaver’s roommates: Christopher Gaines, aged 20, Nichole Kelsay, aged 18, and Robert Porter, aged 18. Nichole Kelsay had been Weaver’s friend throughout most of his life.  In May 2007, with Judge Langford Floyd presiding, Christopher Gaines pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison without parole; he is serving his sentence at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore. Porter pleaded guilty to murder and first degree robbery in September 2007, and received two consecutive life sentences;[2] he is serving his sentence at William E. Donaldson Correctional Facility in Bessemer. Kelsay pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment for conspiracy to commit murder.  This crime was featured in Small Town Gay Bar, a 2006 documentary film depicting the difficulties of being gay in the rural South.
Scotty Joe Weaver (March 26, 1986 – July 22, 2004) was an 18-year-old murder victim from Bay Minette, Alabama, whose burned and partially decomposed body was discovered on July 22, 2004, a few miles from the mobile home in which he lived. He had been beaten, strangled and stabbed numerous times, partially decapitated, and his body doused in gasoline and set on fire. The Baldwin County District Attorney, David Whetstone, stated that Weaver’s sexual orientation was a factor in the crime. He remarked that the brutality involved “is suggestive of overkill, which is not something you see in a regular robbery and murder.” Alabama’s hate crimes statute does not apply to people targeted because of their sexual orientation. Three people were charged with capital murder and robbery in connection with the crime, two of whom were Weaver’s roommates: Christopher Gaines, aged 20, Nichole Kelsay, aged 18, and Robert Porter, aged 18. Nichole Kelsay had been Weaver’s friend throughout most of his life. In May 2007, with Judge Langford Floyd presiding, Christopher Gaines pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison without parole; he is serving his sentence at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore. Porter pleaded guilty to murder and first degree robbery in September 2007, and received two consecutive life sentences;[2] he is serving his sentence at William E. Donaldson Correctional Facility in Bessemer. Kelsay pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment for conspiracy to commit murder. This crime was featured in Small Town Gay Bar, a 2006 documentary film depicting the difficulties of being gay in the rural South.
Francis was last seen in Santa Ana, California on April 9, 1979. He had gone to work that day with his father, Dennis, who delivered water tanks to businesses and private homes.  After Dennis finished work, he left Charles at the corner of Chestnut Avenue and Lyon Street while he went to unload his truck. He didn’t want his boss to find out he’d taken Charles along with him, because children were not allowed to ride in the trucks. Dennis told his son to walk to an address in the 300 block of south Lyon Street and wait to be picked up.  When Dennis went to the designated location ten minutes later, Charles was gone. His father searched the neighborhood for half an hour, then notified the police.  Charles’s parents were fighting over custody of him at the time of his disappearance. His mother had legal custody, but he had lived with Dennis for most of his life. He and his father had traveled from Colorado to California three weeks beforehand, in order for Dennis to attend a custody hearing scheduled for April 26. Authorities looked into the possibility that one of the child’s parents was hiding him, but found no evidence to support this theory.  Convicted child killer James Crummel is the prime suspect in Charles’s disappearance, as well as in the 1995 disappearance of 9-year-old Jack Phillips from Big Bear Lake, California. He was a violent serial sexual abuser a record of child molestation dating back to the 1960s. All but one of his known victims were boys in roughly the same age group as Charles and Jack.  A photo of Crummel is posted with this case summary. In August 1967, he abducted a fourteen-year-old Wisconsin boy, molested him and beat him almost to death. He served five years of a thirty-year sentence for the crime. In 1983, he was convicted of the February 1967 murder of an Arizona boy and sentenced to life in prison, but the conviction was overturned in 1987 because of ineffective counsel. He ended up pleading guilty to kidnapping in the Arizona case and was released later that year.  In 1997, Crummel was charged with the murder of a thirteen-year-old neighbor boy, James Wilfred “Jamey” Trotter. Jamey disappeared in 1979. In 1990, Crummel “discovered” the teen’s skull, but it wasn’t identified until 1996. After his murder arrest, investigators approached Crummel about Jack’s case and he offered to confess to Jack’s murder if prosecutors would not seek the death penalty for the Trotter murder.  The deal was turned down and Crummel was convicted of Jamey Trotter’s murder in 2004 and sentenced to death. In June 2012, he committed suicide on death row by hanging himself with an electric cord. He didn’t leave a note.  Charles is missing under suspicious circumstances and investigators believe he may have met with foul play. His case remains unsolved.
Francis was last seen in Santa Ana, California on April 9, 1979. He had gone to work that day with his father, Dennis, who delivered water tanks to businesses and private homes. After Dennis finished work, he left Charles at the corner of Chestnut Avenue and Lyon Street while he went to unload his truck. He didn’t want his boss to find out he’d taken Charles along with him, because children were not allowed to ride in the trucks. Dennis told his son to walk to an address in the 300 block of south Lyon Street and wait to be picked up. When Dennis went to the designated location ten minutes later, Charles was gone. His father searched the neighborhood for half an hour, then notified the police. Charles’s parents were fighting over custody of him at the time of his disappearance. His mother had legal custody, but he had lived with Dennis for most of his life. He and his father had traveled from Colorado to California three weeks beforehand, in order for Dennis to attend a custody hearing scheduled for April 26. Authorities looked into the possibility that one of the child’s parents was hiding him, but found no evidence to support this theory. Convicted child killer James Crummel is the prime suspect in Charles’s disappearance, as well as in the 1995 disappearance of 9-year-old Jack Phillips from Big Bear Lake, California. He was a violent serial sexual abuser a record of child molestation dating back to the 1960s. All but one of his known victims were boys in roughly the same age group as Charles and Jack. A photo of Crummel is posted with this case summary. In August 1967, he abducted a fourteen-year-old Wisconsin boy, molested him and beat him almost to death. He served five years of a thirty-year sentence for the crime. In 1983, he was convicted of the February 1967 murder of an Arizona boy and sentenced to life in prison, but the conviction was overturned in 1987 because of ineffective counsel. He ended up pleading guilty to kidnapping in the Arizona case and was released later that year. In 1997, Crummel was charged with the murder of a thirteen-year-old neighbor boy, James Wilfred “Jamey” Trotter. Jamey disappeared in 1979. In 1990, Crummel “discovered” the teen’s skull, but it wasn’t identified until 1996. After his murder arrest, investigators approached Crummel about Jack’s case and he offered to confess to Jack’s murder if prosecutors would not seek the death penalty for the Trotter murder. The deal was turned down and Crummel was convicted of Jamey Trotter’s murder in 2004 and sentenced to death. In June 2012, he committed suicide on death row by hanging himself with an electric cord. He didn’t leave a note. Charles is missing under suspicious circumstances and investigators believe he may have met with foul play. His case remains unsolved.